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Review: The Tiger’s Child

The Tiger’s Child by Torey Hayden

Non-Fiction. Published 1995.

Read: February 2013, 264 pages

★★★☆☆

Book Blurb:

When Hayden first met Sheila, she refused to speak, her only communication coming through bursts of destructive, violent behavior.  After five intense months, Hayden successfully broke through to Sheila, and successfully fought to have her placed in a regular classroom.

Hayden did not see Sheila again until she was 13. Much to Hayden’s astonishment, Sheila remembered little about their extraordinary time together. As Hayden continues to renew her relationship with the teenage Sheila, the memories slowly come back, bringing with them feelings of abandonment and hostility.

Impressions:

The Tiger’s Child is the squeal to One Child where it catches up to Sheila and Torey’s life years later. I adored One Child- you can check out my review of it hereAlthough it fills in the rest of the story for the reader, it neglects to be pleasantly delivered. This book is “more honest” as Sheila puts it.

Thoughts:

It is far too often that children are mistreated and abandoned. Sheila is no exception. You learn of further abuse she suffered and the difficulties that remain ahead of her as a teenager. Sheila begins working with Torey as an aide for a summer program with children. Torey sees Sheila more as a client than as her caretaker, which is what Sheila is longing fore. I was appalled that Torey got a letter from Sheila reaching out about suicide and did not respond. It takes a whole year more and more letters from Sheila until she visits her a children’s residential treatment facility.

It breaks your heart to see the pain Sheila endures and her strained relationship with Torey. One thing to take from this book is that Sheila felt ‘Torey/social services/the system’ should and could have done more for her. She was continually forced to remain within an unstable, abusive, and dangerous environment.

Quotes:

What I remember are the colors…as if my whole world had been in black and white. -p61

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Review: More Hot Stuff to Help Kids Chill Out

More Hot Stuff to Help Kids Chill Out by Jerry Wilde

Non-Fiction. Published 2000.

Read: February 2013, 85 pages

★★★☆☆

Book Blurb:

This is a follow up to the popular original Hot Stuff provides children and adolescents with new ideas to cope with anger and hostility. This book also contains ideas to help manage stress, which is an important component of any anger management program. More Hot Stuff is filled with more illustrations, more activities, and more ideas to help kids learn to handle their anger before their anger handles them.

Impressions:

I do not own the original Hot Stuff so I cannot speak to it’s comparison. This little book is packed of starting points for kids to grasp how anger and stress interact. It has an anger survey at the beginning and end to show your improvements in each area the book covers. I would recommend this primarily for late elementary or middle school ages. It is a workbook style and has illustrations to break up monotony.

Thoughts:

More Hot Stuff  points out that we are in control of our anger. It addresses our self-talk.. what are we telling ourselves about anger?

Importantly, the author added several facts and information on the seriousness of stress and ways to reduce stress- the always important positive coping skills such as calling a friend, exercising, listening to music, being artistic, mediating, playing a musical instrument, and reading. I really like this book and use the concepts regularly. It would be great for a take home assignment. Anger causing beliefs, errors in thinking, and managing anger are included as well.

Quotes:

You, and only you, control how you feel. -p24

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Review: The Five Love Languages

The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman

Non-Fiction. Published 1992.

Read: January 2013, 203 pages

★★★★☆

Book Blurb:

Skillful communication is within your grasp. While love is a many splendored thing, it is sometimes a very confusing thing, too. And as people come in all varieties, shapes, and sizes, so do their choices of personal expressions of love. But more often than not, the giver and the receiver express love in two different ways. Dr. Chapman identifies these and guides you towards a better understanding of your unique languages of love. Learn to speak and understand your mate’s love language, and in no time you will be able to effectively love and truly feel loved in return.

Impressions:

The Five Love Languages was enjoyable and insightful. It offers a guide to specific and personal ways people express their love. Everyone has different needs and when they aren’t met it’s hard for others to reciprocate love. Dr. Chapman insists that speaking the love language of your mate will even rekindle a relationship that appears to be broken beyond repair. I recommend this book to all who are seeking to improve their relationships with others. At times the book is wordy and technical, but the author adds many relatable examples of real couples to illustrate his points.

Thoughts:

We all have unique preferences when it comes to expressing and receiving love. Dr. Chapman lays out what each love language is and how to identify which category a personal falls in to. Your love language is the way that you most feel loved and cared for. The problem is most people know how they want to be loved, but that doesn’t tend to align with how their partner wants to be loved. You have to learn to speak your partner’s love language. The five love languages are:

  1. Words Of Affirmation: Encouraging words, verbal compliments, kind words, appreciation, humble words, admiration
  2. Quality Time: Togetherness, focused attention, quality conversation, listening, expressing emotions, scheduled activities
  3. Gifts: Purchased gifts, physical presence, made gifts
  4. Acts Of Service: Doing something for your partner that you know they would like for you to do
  5. Physical Touch: Holding, intimacy

Quotes:

Requests give direction to love, but demands stop the flow of love. -p92

Love doesn’t erase the past, but it makes the future different. -p130

Is it possible to love someone whom you hate? -p147

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